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As you probably know by now, I like to see what people have been reading, and enjoy a little discussion each month or so. It's a good way to get ideas of what to add to your own list (and sometimes, what not to add to your list). So, what did you read in February and March? Remember, for the purposes of discussion, reading done for class absolutely "counts". You can decide to write a little blurb for each selection you read, or you can choose my lazy route and wait for people to inquire--your choice.

I'll post my own list in comments.

Comments

( 8 comments — Leave a comment )
cacophonesque
Apr. 5th, 2009 07:38 pm (UTC)
Some firsts, some re-reads
Making History, Michael Long
The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K. LeGuin
The Iliad, Homer, trans. Robert Fagles
The End of It, Mitchell Goodman
Morning in the Burned House, Margarey Atwood
The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam, trans. Edward FitzGerald
Little Birds, Anais Nin
The Game, Diana Wynne Jones
Sappho: A New Translation, trans. Mary Barnard
House of Incest, Anais Nin
Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror, John Ashbery

Edited at 2009-04-05 07:39 pm (UTC)
teaberryblue
Apr. 5th, 2009 08:21 pm (UTC)
Re: Some firsts, some re-reads
Psst, you read Watchmen, too!

Edited at 2009-04-05 08:28 pm (UTC)
cacophonesque
Apr. 5th, 2009 08:46 pm (UTC)
Re: Some firsts, some re-reads
Actually, it's in my pile of "in-progress" reads. I'm only partway through it. It's pretty common for me to be working on several works at one time, because my attention span shifts, my interests fluctuate, and I don't like to carry certain books around with me (too large/awkwardly shaped/hefty for my purse).
cetacea
Apr. 5th, 2009 08:13 pm (UTC)
Apology for Raymond Sebond by Michel de Montaigne
Discourse on Method by René Descartes
A Feast For Crows by George R. R. Martin
Wild Magic by Tamora Pierce
Doctors: The Biography of Medicine by Sherwin B. Nuland (This book was absolutely awful, in my opinion. My review from Goodreads, if you're interested in why I thought it was awful: Whiggish history, at its worst. This book did contain a lot of information, I just wish Nuland had kept his opinions about how science and medicine "should be" out of it. Also, his writing had far too many poetical flourishes for my taste. It was really quite annoying to hear him go on page-long love notes to the scientific methods of certain surgeons and doctors. I was also annoyed by the focus on surgeons, the inherent Western bias, and the complete absence of any mention of the cont...more Whiggish history, at its worst. This book did contain a lot of information, I just wish Nuland had kept his opinions about how science and medicine "should be" out of it. Also, his writing had far too many poetical flourishes for my taste. It was really quite annoying to hear him go on page-long love notes to the scientific methods of certain surgeons and doctors. I was also annoyed by the focus on surgeons, the inherent Western bias, and the complete absence of any mention of the contributions of nurses to medicine. It should be titled Doctors (Well, Really, Surgeons): The Biography of a Very Small Portion of Western Medicine.)
A History of Public Health by George Rosen
Wolf-Speaker by Tamora Pierce
Emma by Jane Austen
Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street by Herman Melville
Emperor Mage by Tamora Pierce
The Realms of the Gods by Tamora Pierce
Against Method by Paul Feyerabend
Knowledge and Social Imagery by David Bloor
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

The Tamora Pierce quartet was a re-read, but the rest were all first-time reads. Lots of them were for various classes. Emma, Bartleby the Scrivener, and The Hound of the Baskervilles were all audiobooks that I downloaded from LibriVox, which is a lovely site that gives me tons of older books to listen to (for free!) while doing menial research assistant labor.
cacophonesque
Apr. 5th, 2009 08:53 pm (UTC)
I love Bartleby! The book that I have has "Bartleby the Scrivener" and "Benito Cereno" together. I'm not sure that you've ever read the latter, but if not, I think you might like it.
teaberryblue
Apr. 5th, 2009 08:28 pm (UTC)
I always feel so insufficient next to all the heavy readers on this list.

I read:

The first three volumes of The Runaways by Brian K Vaughan, Adrian Alphona, and Takeshi Miyazawa (plus inks, coloring, and lettering by others).
Valiant by Holly Black
Zot!: the complete collected black & white issues, by Scott McCloud
The Rough Guide to Graphic Novels by Danny Fingeroth

I reread Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons.
dragonmagelet
Apr. 6th, 2009 03:09 am (UTC)
I can't recall everything I read these last months--a lot of chronic rereading of old favorites, honestly (*coughendlessTamoraPiercecoughhackcough*)

BUT I read a couple for the first time:

The Sea of Trolls, Nancy Farmer

I loved this. Don't be turned off by the goofy cover and title; the writing is simple, but the story is not. It's a re-imagining of the Viking world and Norse mythology that's, frankly, inspired. The main character is a Saxon boy who gets kidnapped by Vikings and winds up headed for Jotunheim, which in Farmer's world is Scandinavia. Anyway, it's just lovely. Lovely.

Territory, Emma Bull

It's the only novel of hers I've read since War for the Oaks, which is kickass urban fantasy from the 80's. Territory is a retelling of the Wyatt Earp/Doc Holliday/Cowboys saga with an undercurrent of magic. It sounded absurd, but I have a secret love of cowboys, so I went out and got it. It turned out to be kind of gorgeously written, subtle, lovely imagery, solid characters, great story. It ends really abruptly, but she's working on a sequel that I hope will excuse it.
clytemnestra215
Apr. 6th, 2009 11:20 am (UTC)
True West by Sam Shepard
Night Watch by Sergei Lukyanenko
Day Watch by Sergei Lukyanenko
Dykes to Watch Out For by Alison Bechdel
The Music Teacher by Barbara Hall
Fables: Legends in Exile by Bill Willingham
Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons
The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins
Fables: Animal Farm by Bill Willingham
Standing Female Nude by Carol Ann Duffy
Fly by Night by Frances Hardinge
Fables: Storybook Love by Bill Willingham
Jack of Fables: The (Nearly) Great Escape by Bill Willingham
The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Emmuska Orczy
Fables: The Mean Seasons by Bill Willingham
Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys
Jack of Fables: Jack of Hearts by Bill Willingham
Jack of Fables: The Bad Prince by Bill Willingham
Fables: Wolves by Bill Willingham
Fables: Homelands by Bill Willingham
Fables: Arabian Nights (and Days) by Bill Willingham
Fables: Son of Empire by Bill Willingham
The Commitment by Dan Savage

True West was and always is fabulous. I ended up not really liking the Lukyanenko novels; they derailed into amateur writing mistakes and became annoying as hell. The Music Teacher was a solid read. I would recommend it to anyone who loves music, especially those who've played an instrument. It is like a love letter to music from the perspective of a bitter, sarcastic woman who won me over early in the narrative.

As might be evidenced from the large quantity of Willingham graphic novels, I fell in love with the Fables series and in even more love with the spin-off series, Jack of Fables, which is hilarious and worth sticking through, because it only gets better with each volume.

I am wildly in lust and love with Sir Percy Blakeney of The Scarlet Pimpernel and cannot believe I never read it before.

I didn't like Wide Sargasso Sea. I hated the way it portrayed Rochester, and that's a stretch even for me, as I loooathe Rochester. But it wasn't fair to him.

The Commitment was an enjoyable memoir about gay marriage, commitment and marriage in general and I'd recommend it to anyone who is married or wants to marry or wonders if they should marry or knows they don't want to marry. So basically, I'd recommend it to anyone. It's well-written and I really connected to the people in the memoir, which is rare for me as generally I could give a fuck about people in memoirs. And above all (I'm a petty, impatient bitch about this and stop reading most that don't deliver), it was constantly amusing.

Edited at 2009-04-06 11:23 am (UTC)
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